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Peace. Be Still. Calming the Chaos of Your Inner Voice

April 27, 2014

Recently I have been struggling with how my business should develop and grow. Over the last few years I have created a practice I have been happy with and helping individuals create the business of their dreams. But something has been missing in my business. For over a year I have been toying with making some much needed changes and but didn’t. Why upset the applecart? Things are going well….I continued to operate in a status quo mode.

All this changed when I ramped up my study of God’s word, talked with close friends about my new vision and really sat back to listen to God’s whispers. Today I have a new vision and I am working on implementing it (more to come in the coming months).

Now fast forward about a month, when I made the commitment to listen to the whispers, as I was surfing the internet for a reference I came across Blogging For Books. Hmm… what a great opportunity to get free Christian themed books, all I have to do is select and read one of the books and write my honest opinion of the book on my blog. I immediately signed up. As I was browsing through the list of available books I came across Steven Furtick’s newest book Crash The Chatterbox – Hearing God’s Voice Above All Others. The title alone was enough to grab my attention but the synopsis sealed the deal. It spoke to what I had experienced over the past couple of years and still experience as I move forward with my new vision. I read the book with great interest as well as someone who needs to provide my honest opinion to those who read this blog post.

The book is written to inspire those who are new the Christian journey as well as those who are further along. The book is broken into four main sections giving personal examples as well as examples from the Bible. While the book dragged in some sections for me I came away with the four confessions (God says I am, God says He will, God says He has, and God says I can) and practical ways to quite the chatterbox which keeps me from hearing God and being all He desires me to be.

My overall rating for this book is a 3.5 out of 5. While it inspired me it was more of a reminder of what I already know as a child of God. If you would like to read the first chapter of the book please visit Scribd at http://www.scribd.com/doc/202692814/Crash-the-Chatterbox-Hearing-God-s-Voice-Above-All-Others. Happy Reading and please let me know your thoughts of the book.

Wishing you productivity and prosperity,


Please note: I received this book, Crash the Chatterbox – Hearing God’s Voice Above All Others, for free from WaterBrook Multnomah Publishing Group for this review.

 

 

Challenge Complete!

January 31, 2013

On January 4th I signed up for the Ultimate Blog Challenge. To complete the challenge I needed to write 31 blog posts in the month of January and comment on at least two other blog posts from other challengers. After being dormant on my blog writing for a while I felt the challenge was the perfect motivation for me to get back in the swing of things. It worked. During this month I posted the following:

  1. It’s That Time Again – New Year, New Business Goals
  2. 5 Must Reads for a New Entrepreneur
  3. Marketing Your New Nonprofit – 3 Must Reads To Help You Get The Word Out
  4. Mark Your Calendar – Important Planning Tips for a New Entrepreneur
  5. Help! I Can’t Afford a Professional Grant-Writer…
  6. 4 Tips to Successful Fundraising
  7. Six Keys to an Effective Grant Proposal
  8. Encourage Yourself – Acknowledging Your Accomplishments
  9. Common Blunders in Business Planning
  10. Tip to Gain Business Leads – Read Local Newspapers
  11. Tip to Manage Your Business Finances – Use Purchase Orders and Sign Checks Personally
  12. Non-Profits Should Prepare a Common Grant Applications
  13. Do You Know the Face of Your Client?
  14. Clarify Your Vision…
  15. If You Don’t Play, You Can’t Win! – Check out Business Plan Competitions
  16. Setting the Price of Your Service – Part 1: Floor Price
  17. Setting the Price of Your Service – Part 2: Ceiling Price
  18. Business Financial Tip: Importance of Opening a Business Checking Account
  19. “I Have a Dream” – How Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Can Inspire You to Start Your Business
  20. Setting the Price of Your Service – Part 3: What About the Competition?
  21. Our small non-profit would like to fundraise-where should we start?
  22. Setting the Price of Your Service – Part 4: My Service Cost
  23. Get Things Done – 10 Time Saving Tips for Entrepreneurs
  24. Help New Entrepreneurs: How Did You Name Your Business?
  25. Sharing Great Content – What Is Your Favorite Curating Site?
  26. I Have Great Business Idea but I’m Not Ready to Take the Plunge – What Can I Do to Prepare Myself?
  27. Financial Basics for Your Nonprofit
  28. Three Tips to Vet Potential Clients
  29. Establishing Strategic Alliances
  30. What Causes You Stress in Running Your Nonprofit?
  31. What Causes You Stress in Running Your Small Business?

The second part of the challenge to read and comment on blog post from other challenges was also enjoyable. I came across some great content that will help me in my business as well as personal inspirational sites. Although the challenge is over I look forward to continuing my momentum of posting more frequently and reading posts from other bloggers. I’m looking forward to participating in the next challenge.

Wishing you productivity and prosperity,

Kim

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What Causes You Stress in Running Your Small Business?

January 30, 2013

My previous blog requested information about stress points in running a nonprofit. It seems only fair that I also ask the same question to small business owners. So, what are the top three areas that cause you or have caused you stress in running your small business? The information I gather will be used to write a blog series, newsletter articles, provides tips, design workshops and just better understand your needs.

My small business clients have had the following stress triggers:

  1. Finding seed money
  2. Finding customers and clients
  3. Determining if it is time to expand operations

Please feel free to share in the comment section or visit www.kgaskinsconsulting.com and contact me.

Wishing your productivity and prosperity,

Kim


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What Causes You Stress in Running Your Nonprofit?

January 30, 2013

What are your top three areas that cause you or have caused you stress in running your nonprofit? I am interested in gathering information about your stress points so I can write a blog series, newsletter articles, provides tips, design workshops and just better understand your needs. Let me get the ball rolling:

My nonprofit clients have had the following stress triggers:

  1. Finding Suitable Board of Directors
  2. Obtaining Initial Funding to Start Operations
  3. Finding a location to run programs at little or no cost

Please feel free to share in the comment section or visit www.kgaskinsconsulting.com and contact me.

Wishing your productivity and prosperity,

Kim

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Establishing Strategic Alliances

January 29, 2013

Does your nonprofit have any strategic alliances in place? If not you should consider partnering with other organizations which can help you accomplish your mission. Here are five steps to help you establish strategic alliances:

  1. Define the Purpose of the Partnership: Before you look to establish any strategic alliance you need to define what you are looking to accomplish with the partnership. Are you looking for assistance in running a program or looking for a partner to help with funding?
  2. Identify Potential Organization to Work With: Create a list of organizations (both for profit and nonprofit) you would like to partner with and research each one.
  3. Complete a Benefit/Risk Analysis. Rank the list you created based on your search. Complete a benefit/risk analysis for your top 3 choices.
  4. Continue the due diligence and reach out and have conversations with the organizations. Find out if they are interested in partnering, what their goals are and confirm they can meet your purpose.
  5. Sign a mutually beneficial agreement that outlines the terms and conditions of the partnership. Of course before signing any agreement be sure to have it reviewed by your legal representation to ensure your best interests are protected.

Establishing strategic alliances with the right organization can result in a wealth of benefits. Just be sure you do your due diligence to be sure the agreement is in the best interest of both organizations.

Wishing you productivity and prosperity,

Kim

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Three Tips to Vet Potential Clients

January 28, 2013

I originally posted this in March, 2010 but when I read it I felt the information deserves to be shared once again.

Over the last few weeks I have been busy working with existing and several new clients. With a couple of my clients we have been discussing the importance of Vetting Clients. Both clients were talking about how they seem to spend a great deal of time with potential clients who don’t result in a perfect match. A common trait for both individuals was the lack of a system to handle initial project meetings. By having a game plan for these initial meetings you are able to assess if the project is something you would like to be a part of. Here are 3 tips I share with them regarding vetting potential clients.

  • Set A Time Limit. We are all busy so limit the meeting to an hour or less. Start the meeting off by letting the potential client know you know their time is precious and you don’t want to take up more than an hour of their time. As the hour comes to a close you can decided together if you want to continue your conversation or wrap it up.
  • Use Slides to stay on topic. Prepare up to 10 slides to guide your conversation about your business. This will help you stay on topic and ensure you tell the client the information you want them to know about you. Remember your potential client is also vetting you.
  • Have a list of questions. Determine the important information you need to gather in order to determine if you would take on the project. Try to limit the questions to less than 5 and make them open-ended so you can have a conversation. Make sure one of the questions is related to next steps.

At the end of your meeting you should have a good feeling for it you want to take on the project or refer it on to someone in your network. Regardless of your decision keep in mind you want to build a relationship with the client. If this project isn’t for you maybe they will have something else in the future for you. The professionalism you demonstrate will stand out in their mind.

Wishing you productivity and prosperity,

Kim


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Financial Basics for Your Nonprofit

January 28, 2013

Financial statements for a non-profit organization do not play the same role as financial statements for a for-profit company. A nonprofit keeps financial statements to assess how well they are doing at accomplishing its mission. With that in mind let’s take a look at the primary financial reports nonprofits use to measure its financial health:

  • Statement of Financial Position – This statement is similar to the balance sheet for a for-profit company except it looks at net assets rather than owners’ equity. You will gather information to tell you the assets of the company by adding liabilities and net assets (Assets = Liabilities + Net Assets).
  • Statement of Activities – This statement is similar to the an income statement. An organization summarizes by programs, administration and fundraising. For each area you look at the beginning net assets as compared to the ending net assets. The formula first looks at Revenues – Expenses = Changes in Net Assets and then calculates Ending Net Assets by adding the change in net assets to beginning net assets (Revenues – Expenses = Changes in Net Assets + Changes in Net Assets = Ending Net Assets). You can confirm the calculation is correct the ending net assets should agree with the same items on the Statement of Financial position.
  • Statement of Functional Expenses – There is no comparable statement in a for-profit business. This statement is a great way of determining how money is being spent to accomplish the organization’s mission and objects. Expenses are presented for each program area. You then calculate total expenses by adding Program Expenses, Administrative Expenses and Fundraising Expenses. (Total Expenses = Program Expenses + Administrative Expenses + Fundraising Expenses). The expenses on the statement of activities should equal the expenses on the statement of functional expenses.
  • Statement of Cash Flows –This statement is no different from the cash flow statement of a for-profit company but contains non-profit specific information such as grants receivables or cash from donations. To complete the statement you calculate changes in cash by adding cash from operations + cash from investing + cash for financing. (Change in Cash = Cash from Operations + Cash from Investing + Cash from Financing). The balance should agree with the cash balance on the financial position.

Although financial statements don’t play the same role in a non-profit organization as a for-profit they preparation of them are just as important to communicate the organization ability to accomplish their mission and communicate the financial health of the organization.

Wishing you productivity and prosperity,

Kim


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